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Nobel Prize in Literature

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Devon Miller-Duggan, Department of English, on the Nobel Prize in Literature

​Professor Miller-Duggan teaches Creative Writing and is the author of books, including: Pinning the Bird to the Wall (Tres Chicas Books, 2008); Neither Prayer, Nor Bird (forthcoming from Finishing Line Press) . Some of the wide variety of courses that she teaches include ENGL110 - Honors (various subjects); ENGL200 - Approaches to Literature; ENGL207 - Introduction to Poetry; ENGL301 - Expository Writing; ENGL304 - Introduction to Poetry; Writing ENGL367 - Editing the Small Magazine; CMLT203 - Western Literature to 1660; CMLT204 - Western Literature since 1660; ARSC295 - Arts Forum for Distinguished Scholars; and, ARSC390 - Honors Colloquia (various subjects, including Western Masterpieces Since 1660, The 60s, Genre Fiction, The Fisher King, Metaphors Be With You).

Louise Glück

​Prize motivation: "for her unmistakable poetic voice that with austere beauty makes individual existence universal." Apart from her writing Glück is a professor of English at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. She made her debut in 1968 with Firstborn, and was soon acclaimed as one of the most prominent poets in American contemporary literature. She has received several prestigious awards, among them the Pulitzer Prize (1993) and the National Book Award (2014). Glück has published twelve collections of poetry and some volumes of essays on poetry. All are characterized by a striving for clarity. Childhood and family life, the close relationship with parents and siblings, is a thematic that has remained central with her. In her poems, the self listens for what is left of its dreams and delusions, and nobody can be harder than she in confronting the illusions of the self. But even if Glück would never deny the significance of the autobiographical background, she is not to be regarded as a confessional poet. Glück seeks the universal, and in this she takes inspiration from myths and classical motifs, present in most of her works.

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Nobel Prize in Literature
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